Understanding and Predicting the Long-term Labour Market and Migration Trajectories of Immigrants and Their Children in the United Kingdom

Rowe (2018)

Prior empirical research has advanced our understanding of immigrants’ assimilation, their descendants and the role of ethnic concentration. Yet work has remained cross-sectional in nature, focusing on the occupational outcomes and residential locations at a specific point in time. Little progress has been made to understand the trajectories of immigrants and their children over a long period of time. Understanding of the long-term trajectories of immigrants and their children is key to assess their prospects for economic and social success, and develop effective policy interventions to assist their integration process, unleash their skills’ potential and facilitate upward social mobility.

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Francisco Rowe
Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Human Geography

My research interests include human mobility and migration; economic geography and spatial inequality; computational social science.