The Geography of the COVID-19 Pandemic in England

Abstract

COVID-19 has had profound consequences with over 1.77 million positive cases and 62,566 deaths recorded to date (as of 10th December) in the United Kingdom, and record rates of unemployment and economic decline during 2020. Yet, whilst labelled by some as the great leveller, Richmond-Bishop (2020) argues that COVID-19 does not discriminate but society does. Initial evidence suggests that the impacts of COVID-19 are unevenly distributed - both socially and spatially - disproportionately impacting the most disadvantaged communities (Haque et al. 2020; Harris 2020).

Type
Publication
Heseltine Institute for Public Policy, Practice and Place, Policy Brief
Francisco Rowe
Francisco Rowe
Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Human Geography

My research interests include human mobility and migration; economic geography and spatial inequality; computational social science.

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